About your Search

20121226
20130103
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27
of the things that has stuck with me since writing the book is that john lackey and brown men, young boys, they're not educated. they're not accepted in the educational system. part is cultural, party societal. but the dinosaur had the ice age and we have the education and technology age. in the dinosaur didn't make the adjustment is not hearing more. the black and brown male won't be here. the job we used to do, we can't do anymore. not the manufacturing base a lot. we have to make it safe for our children to be smart, to be respect so, to the individual because when i was a boy, i wanted to be accepted so bad i lowered myself so i could see eye to eye. i will never allow that to happen again. i think when you look around you, if i can change the people around me, you have to be unafraid to be by yourself. sometimes sitting by yourself is the clearest you'll ever be. i think there is such a tendency to want to be accepted so bad, was wack, with school, what he said. do we love ourselves. people of all kind of information, but i saw men -- many of the city would do anything to take care of fami
-- and i must say i never met a brown water sailor and i must have interviewed 50 or 60, who didn't love their admiral. i met a lot of people who didn't love the add merrill, but it wasn't his sailors. because bud zumwalt knew from the very beginning, he understood a very simple concept about what leadership and loyalty down met. and this men fested itself throughout -- manifested itself throughout his entire life. but you can't be a reformer, you can't be a trailblazer without making a lot of enemies, and he made enemies. and i doubt any of them are here tonight. be if you are, we'd love to talk about it. he always joked about this, but it's really true. he said i have two long lists -- i have a long list of friends and a long list of enemies, and i'm equally proud of both of them. and as i tell the story tonight, i think that perhaps you'll understand this even better with. and by doing this he became a sailor's admiral, often referred to as zorro, fighting for the rights of pressed navy -- of oppressed navy men and women. the zorro and z which he wore on the back of his shirt and whic
this now most of the brown v. board of education case. why don't you tell us what his role was and why turn out to be controversial. >> he wrote a number of memos in those memos stumbled out on stage in a very red sequins over many years later and they came back to haunt him. so he gets there and percolating up through the courts already going back to 1950 private cases of the naacp legal and education defense fund that thurgood marshall is actually bringing and he's building that, sort of brick by brick, block by block. thurgood marshall not yet of course a justice of the supreme court. he's making the case that plessy versus ferguson, which defined the acceptability of separate but equal. they're making a case of the naacp that this cannot remain the law of the land. and it's pretty clear that the case that is scoring to become a very, very important one for the court is actually the year that rehnquist is barry's brown v. board of education. and so, which churns out a fact to be the case that strikes the doctrine down. very, very important in a unanimous decision of the supreme court. so
spends a lot of time in scotland is a great mimic and does a good gordon brown. but her sense of humor is subtle and dried and one of my favorite examples back in 2003 an american lady was in waiting celebrating her 70th birthday held at a nightclub on the square. the queen was very excited because she had not been to a nightclub since the 1940's when she was married. she had a wonderful time and was seated next to lord salisbury one of the most illustrious aristocrats and the next day she went to the of lords of london and was introduced to dignitaries by the dean of the heavy and he said to the clean. he said you know, him she said yes robert and i were in the nightclub last night. that is the dry humor. >>host: sandy dedell smith is a guest. "elizabeth the queen" is the topic. we will begin with a caller from new york. >> caller: my question is with this band of the queen elizabeth's reign one of the longest in the history of the u.k. with all the prime minister's she has worked with how has that impacted her as a queen from your knowledge? >>guest: she has a vast store of informat
not have the same power it did 50 years ago. of browning of america produced the first black president and something about listening to that fear is legitimate and those in power have to give it up. we have to listen to the other side to figure out the common ground to push to a place we can feel good about what is possible if we come together and think critically of our past to imagine our future together. >> host: what type of class is to teach? >> guest: i do a lot of film. i am also a film maker. refocus on graduate courses for mediums for scholarships. they say they like the books but the only people there reid them are the scholars but in a film everybody will see the project. that is essential but also the idea if you think about the world and use film to tell a story it may allow you to say different things but it is a good vehicle to produce these scholarships for your colleagues. what about the visual dissertation or produces knowledge with images and sound to count as scholarship the way a journal article would count. we do a lot of that work with the graduate curriculum. i
: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: i ask unanimous consent top dispense with the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: madam president, i ask unanimous consent the period for morning business for debate only be extended until 3:00 p.m. with senators -- for debate only to be extended until 3:00 p.m. with senators permitted to speak up to ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: thank you, madam president. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. corker: madam president, i'd like to ask unanimous consent that we vitiate the quorum call. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. corker: madam president, i just listened to the president and my heart is still pounding. i was very disappointed to hear what the president just had to say in front of a pep rally. something very unbecoming of where we are at
. mr. brown: i thank the senior senator from illinois, the assistant majority leader. the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: thank you, madam president. i concur in the remarks that senator durbin just made, especially about the vote last night. i -- you know, the most -- the primary thing we did was we spared that $2,000 tax increase for so many families in california and illinois and ohio and acrossing this country. i remember the presiding officer telling a group of us last night how many hundreds of thousands of californians would have been -- would have lost their unemployment insurance if we had not acted last night the way that we did. my criteria -- fundamental criteria in voting on this issue and voting for this issue was we were able successfully to stop cuts in social security to pay for some of this plan or raising the retirement age for medicare or not doing the unemployment insurance in the way that we did. so all of those were victories last night. i also concur with senator durbin that we -- while adding five years to the earned-income tax credit, l
word. i got the book and read the opening sentence in the store. jackie brown, at 26, with no expression on his face, said that he could get some guns. i finished the book at home in one sitting, it was like 180 pages, and felt like i had been set free. he moved to story almost entirely with dialogue. the conversations of cops and criminals. their voices establishing the style of his writing. i stopped trying to care what was going on in my books, and begin to show, begin to show what from the points of view and the voices of the characters. bad guys and good ones, the way george higgins used his ear to tell what his people were up to. five years after the call came up, a "new york times" review of one of my books said that often cannot resist a set piece, and lowbrow or a, with a crazy kind of scatological poetry. with the manner of george v. higgins. that's pretty much how i learned to write in a style, i lifted from higgins, but changed enough until it became my own stuff. i want to thank the national book foundation for my award, and recognizing executive director
and brown laid it out as to why that vote was so critically important it protected our families. it gave certainty to our businesses. and it keeps this economy moving forward. and all this is true if the house passes this bill. now, as senator enzi said so eloquently and in such a straightforward fashion, this is a deal. this is a deal. and each of us could write our own deal, and each of us would be so much happier with the deal that we personally can write. but that is not the way it is. we are not a parliamentary system. we're one party -- where one party controls everything. in a parliamentary system that you see in europe, one of one party controlling everything. they have a program. the other party opposition has a program. there may be other parties as well. but two major parties. one of them gets elected. they put together a coalition. they have the discipline. they have the program. they don't have to sit down with people they don't see eye to eye with. they just have to get together and pass the program. if the people don't like it, there's a vote of confidence and out they go,
brown shock with sideburns. his body was smooth and his chest was hairless. without definition, though he could attack him and easily. mark twain's mustache and goatee were unimpressive. he wore a coat of smoke and soot, which is the three men played poker, to meet their bare feet, there was a secret tunnel. under that, a huge raft upon which the massive granite building floated. two doors down and a half a block away later murders corner. in early may, he took a two-month visit to john briggs and eight former classmate in hannibal. and literally took hours. a thorough fare he likened to just like being on main street in hannibal and meaningful familiar faces. the montgomery block block dominated montgomery and washington streets. number 722 and 724 montgomery. it had been a gold rush tobacco warehouse and now the man, mark twain, setting his cars. it was cold and sweaty in his palm. he took a swig. a few droplets caught in his horseshoe mustache, and he left them there. he spoke and he had become addicted on the mississippi. he contributed his own cloud and by the barrel for $4, he he
-school seniors show proficiency in u.s. history. that the report said only 2 percent can explain what brown feet board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you take if the chinese history. >> to see it through the other rise in? >> but he said with gap what we said looks to the russians obamacare has some of that ability. >> talk about obama. your chapter is entitled provocatively. [laughter] in some ways they've made it worse. >> the longest chapter of the book. >> it might get longer. >> then i see the cuts that we have to make but to deal with a contemporary is a lot of interest in obama. then to pull back. >> but there were people on the right to and those who would disagre
thing -- scott brown, i'm afraid. [laughter] the great story there, the last one to do this, and he did it successfully with pat moynihan in new york. he ran against william buckley's brother jim. at the first debate, buckley turned to him and starts bashing comes right out of the court with moynihan. he looks up and says, oh, the mudslinging begins. [laughter] >> thank you. tell us and generalize for us, historians have not typically have access to anything resembling this kind of material with the exception of nixon and whatever. how were we to regard the source of information? what is it? you have to check it? is a good way to his? >> i think it is good to go. what is wonderful about these tapes is the immediacy of them. also, we do have other presidential tapes to listen to. one of the things that i actually love about these tapes of the conversations between president kennedy and his brother. when you listen to the nixon tapes, they have a certain quality. then you listen to the two kennedy brothers talking about how mean this guy is. it sounds so quaint as opposed to some of what
brown shock with side burns. his chest was hairless, and his body smooth. well muscled, but without definition though he could heft two men easily. in comparison to twain's remarkable soup strainer, his moustache and goatee were unimpressive. sawyer was not completely nude, he wore a coat of smoke and soot which as the three men played poker, the hot steam back inally washed away -- gradually washed away. beneath their bare feet coursed an ancient secret tunnel, and under that a huge raft upon which the massive four-story granite building floated. two doors down was a distillery. two doors up was the gold weighing room. gold weighing station. and a half a block away lay the bloodstained ground of murderer's corner. in the early may twain had departed virginia city for a two month visit to san francisco to visit bill briggs, the handsome brother of john briggs, a close friend in hand ball -- hand bl. twain initially passed hours at ed stall's posh ground room floor barbershop and basement steam bath on montgomery street. a thoroughfare he likened to just like being on main street and
know you have spoken to several of the schools. how can we get you there are? >> little brown. you can contact them. i am doing some middle schools in west palm beach now, jfk. >> actually one of the students at my school is now at the school i work in. i work in a library. >> okay, well. the school of the arts there, i saw their holiday concert was mind-boggling, the music and we are actually going to do it at the cravitt center this week. we paid to have it in there so that's going to be spectacular. yes, maam, sir, somebody. hi. >> the book middle school -- >> the bring the mic down to you. >> in the book middle school, the worst years of my life. [inaudible] >> lets not get into this because this is hard to imagine or believe that not everybody in the room has actually read the book yet. so i don't want to give away. if you are around at the book signing -- though we will talk about it privately. >> okay. also, -- >> but don't give away what happens in the book. i will have to come strangle you. [laughter] >> also, when did you first -- and what was it? >> the i wrote the first boo
% could explain what the brown v board of education was about even though the answer was implicit threat so our kids don't know much history and a lot of what they know is wrong to read this book is based upon the work of great historians and you mention of great historians or doing some kind of work but we have a big sweep and because we are able to couple this with showtime documentary and a get more dramatic. disconnect it's like history one-on-one. why cannot be. i have to say when you read these history books it's not -- its coherent. there are no patterns. we don't understand how that works and kids get the dates, the detectors but the united states always comes out ahead. we can trash iraq twice. >> the concept is to go through the global history to see it on the franchise. >> he's all the world and kept saying to truman look how what we are doing looks to the russian soviets, and we don't have that ability to have some ability and certainly very helpful in the beginning. >> obama is entitled provocative plea. let's give the title you said you took a bad situation and certainly ma
colleagues ambassador haqqani and eric brown. it's my pleasure to host today's event. it's the subject, wonderful new book by my guests, lela gilbert. and here it is. it's title is "saturday people, sunday people" israel through the eyes of a christian sojourner. ms. gilbert is here to discuss her book with us. before introducing and turning to her book itself, let me say a few words by way of introduction about lela herself. lela has had a very impressive and very much of a concern with the arts including music. she has been a songwriter and worked extensively with musical groups including an african children's chorus based in uganda and composed of the condon and kenyan orphans. i may add that she has passed on her artistic gifts to her two sons,. .. and dylan. .. is a gifted photographer and photographs on the cover of the book. dylan is dylan is a gifted songwriter and musician. as her work in africa may suggest she has also been an extensive traveler, works in africa, africa, south and east asia, europe and of course the middle east. by far the largest part of her work has been as
, the various cultures from which they could draw source. the sun into an academic brown, already went beyond symbolism and the kids of the material. it is necessary to quarry in two spirituality, i btwo spirituality, i believe, of any society into it in order to start the valuable and valued cultural weapon right within that society. i'm impressed by the consistent the with which the quiet the, the kwanzaa season is celebrated in the united states. i believe it's coming up again in december this year. it is a move in the right direction. but i think a lot greater depth is required in the approach of african-americans. the only way to do it is not just in the classrooms. it's also to seize the opportunity of visiting africa, the real africa, not the french africa, not the arab africa, not the british africa, but there are places on the african continent in which even when european visitors to the end to south africa or some other places say yes, now i can see them all, feel, taste africa in those places exist. and to go there and sit at the feet of the leaders, the cultural leaders, spiritual
explain what brown vs. board of education was was about. even though the answer was implicit in the question. so our kids don't know much history, and a lot of what they know is wrong. and so if the book is based upon the work of great historians. you're mentioned and a lot of historians doing similar work. but we have a big sweep, and because we're able to couple this with the showtime documentary, able to make it more dramatic. >> tried to make it a primer. like a basic text, like history 101. why can it not be? i have to say when you read these history books, it's not -- it's not coherent. there's no pattern so we don't see what we were just talking about, the empirement you don't understand how that works and the kids get the dates and the pictures but don't -- the united states always comes out ahead, always comes out okay. we can trash iraq twice. >> if you look -- if you take chinese history in china, and -- >> global history to see it through russian eyes, chinese eyes, french eyes. >> basically what is unique he saw the world not just through u.s. eyes, wallace said,
brown v board said after segregationist contrary to the constitution then you have a case that it arises out of little rock. little rock begins when a judge says we mean that. by the way the first year after brown what happened? the second year nothing. the third year they finally get around to doing something and the judge says put those children in the schools and so what happens? some of us can remember the governor of arkansas called on his militia to get them into the school and to keep them out. and the congressman down there who was a moderate arrange a meeting with eisenhower whose president and president eisenhower and its roof of a governor come he goes into the room, and he says let them do it, let them do it, i will integrate the school and he goes out of the room and tells the press the opposite. and he says the president dressed me down like a sergeant, like a general tour system assurgent. that's what happens. then eisenhower's is what do i have to do coming and he says to jimmy byrnes the governor from south carolina what do i do, and burns was a moderate democrat that re
press, an imprint of harpercollins. kevin powers, the yellow bird. published by little brown. [applause] the 2012 national book award for fiction dose -- goes to "the round house", by louise erdrich. [applause] ♪ ♪ hey, baby, where are you is? [laughter] [applause] [laughter] >> wow. hello, my relatives. [speaking in native tongue] national book foundation and also the judges, and a shout out for all of the native people who are watching this live stream. [applause] i want to thank harpercollins. it's not each a huge company anymore -- can it's not even a huge company anymore. [laughter] but it's always been about four or five people to me. people who believed so strongly in my work that they've supported me and my family and literature. my bookstore and all of us who work there through these years. i want to thank my editor, terry cardin, for believing in the book. [applause] jonathan burnham, jane byrne, jim duffy, i want to thank andrew wily and jim ott. [applause] i want to say to my fellow writers, you've written extraordinary books. i don't really know why i'm standing here, b
prosecutions. i did the same thing in ohio with senator brown in cleveland. same witnesses, ohio election officials and questions -- same questions, same answers. it's come down to this. elections in america are supposed to be a contest between candidates with voters making the ultimate judgment. instead into many state elections become a contest between voters and special interest groups like alec, which are hell-bent on limiting the right of americans to vote. look what happened during this last election. things that i think need to be changed are embarrassing to us. how can we be satisfied with our fellow citizens stand in line for seven hours to vote until 2:30 a.m.? doesn't make sense for state legislatures to reduce early voting opportunities? and the flexibility many working americans need to exercise their right to vote. how can we watch laws being passed in legislatures requiring identification which the legislators know full well that hundreds of thousands of people will never be able to obtain in time to vote? should we be to appointed by the increasing number of increasing num
. mr. brown: i ask the quorum call be dispensed. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: thank you, mr. president. on sunday we confirmed carol galante as the new commissioner of the federal housing administration, the f.h.a. i want to thank my 19 republican colleagues who supported her nomination. it was an important step forward for f.h.a. special thanks to senator corker for his work on this, my colleague on the senate banking committee. my democratic colleagues and i have cleared an important commonsense piece of legislation on our side. it's passed overwhelmingly in the house. we've received little cooperation from some of our republican colleagues because it did not include everything that they want. it's clear the f.h.a.'s mutual mortgage insurance fund is facing significant financial issues. two years ago senator begich and i introduced an f.h.a. reform bill. for a time we collaborated with senator vitter from louisiana who worked with me on legislation with the g.a.o. and other things, and with senator isakson on that effort. so i know that many of my colleagues
handsome. maybe that's not the best description. strikingly handsome with piercing brown eyes and an aqua line knows, olive skin and an irrepressible sense of confidence. .. the most significant manufacturing industry in the 20th century history. i'm semi-taking liberty douglas got things pulitzer prize. superman has this helpful history around the time adult issues. it's an iconic place for the civil rights struggle and the children's crusade in 1963. but what is he able to do in birmingham in a way that challenges what we think about this. >> he did not want to be a farmer. he did not want to be a sharecropper. this is a place that early on was that segregated. we think about her manhattan is misrepresented -- but the office, when he first appears in the census as a homeowner has white neighbors end up with that, not the time. it was a place where someone who wanted to make his mark at at the field could do that. >> so he buys property? >> he buys property. >> another property owner. >> between you and me again -- >> s.,
, senator scott brown, massachusetts republicans won a special election three years ago to when they see that delete kennedy. and later, joe liebermann retiring after four terms in the senate. >> thank you mr. president. i would like to get what they were caught here my address. we spent time in the office waiting a long speech and once i read it i realized it's more emotional than i thought it was at the speech aside at last night i made myself a lot of note of what i wanted to say and i realized this morning and i was trying to get the last word and on a lot of the politics we've been discussing. so i set it aside and just sort of decided to speak from my heart for a few minutes. certainly, this is much more emotional than i thought it is a look around this room, the realization that i'm standing here on the senate floor, speaking for the last time is a lot to digest and certainly makes me very appreciative of the privilege revoked and given to the american people and particularly those who have come before us who have given
. piercing brown eyes. olive skin and irrepressible sense of confidence. most were sharecroppers, a former slaves and scramble then the red clay fields the promise had withered like the spring grass seared by the summer sun. even his father who gave him that lighter skin never giving him legitimacy. t2 was born a slave and the man who's a identity he may have never known. he moves to birmingham alabama. but ultimately to provide the raw materials for the automobile industry, the manufacturing industry, and i take the liberty with the pulitzer prize-winning book but there's an awful history that is an iconic place for the civil rights struggle. what can dolphus do in birmingham? >> guest: he did not want to be a farmer or sharecropper. this was not segregated. reef being given as representatives but. >> it was not uncommon but someone who wanted to make his mark could do that. he buys property. >> host: so he is an amazing character. and is the most distant relative with this story but also people know him and how you could write about the life of melvenia. >> guest: a woman who was born in
brown hadn't even been sworn in yet in massachusetts and the url scott brown 2012.com was already purchased. but so may women had been in washington for so many years as legislators, working on important work, and yet their names never bubbled to the top. and we were curious why not? >> how did you decide you wanted to write this book with all three of you have studied similar topics, but how did the book actually come about? >> your idea. >> well, i guess it was my idea. i've been a political nerd, i don't know, my parents still remember my sister and i in 1960 stagy a nixon-kennedy debate with our stuffed animals. my alpha and beta her rabbit. -- my elephant beat her rabbit. during all those years of nerve them, what always -- the magis that would come out that would preview the eight or 10 or 12 evil ought to be considered. and it simply struck me after seeing so many of those issues, so many magazines, that women were not making it on to that list. they were not being thought to be presidential. they were thought for some reason not to be presidential timber. so as an academic
. with that, i yield the floor and see the senator from ohio. mr. brown: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: i thank the senator from tennessee who is a valued member of the banking committee. thank you for your comments in support of mrs. galante. i heard the criticisms senator shelby offered. i want to answer a couple of those and then want to go on with the support of mrs. galante. two years i introduced an f.h.a. reform bill which unfortunately because of people on the other side has been blocked for whatever reasons. two weeks ago we tried to pass the f.h.a. emergency fiscal solvency act, a commonsense reform measure that came out of the house of representatives, sponsored by a republican from illinois, congressman begert, a chair of the house services subcommittee. it passed the house on a suspension of 402-7. passing that bill would not have prevented action that connects congress, yet my colleagues, some of my colleagues stand in the way of taxpayer protections. let me turn to ms. galante and the reason i'm supporting her nomination. i'm inclined to
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27